The possibility of using the chapman-richards and näslund functions to model height-diameter relationships in hemiboreal old-growth forest in Estonia

Kristi Nigul, Allar Padari, Andres Kiviste, Steffen M. Noe, Henn Korjus, Diana Laarmann, Lee E. Frelich, Kalev Jõgiste, John A. Stanturf, Teele Paluots, Eneli Põldveer, Vivika Kängsepp, Harli Jürgenson, Marek Metslaid, Ahto Kangur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In light of the difficulties in stand volume estimation of natural forests, we analyzed height-diameter relationships and derived a set of height estimation equations for volume estimation for naturally developing forest ecosystems, using the Järvselja old-growth and the Laeva commercial forest in Estonia as a case study. This contribution presents an approach to model individual tree height-diameter relationships for Scots pine, common aspen, silver and downy birch, Norway spruce, black alder, gray alder, linden species, European ash, Norway maple, deciduous species and coniferous species in multi-size and mixed-species naturally developing stands in Estonia. Single-tree-level data were collected in 2013. Two methods were used to obtain stand-level data: whole surface inventory and partial surface inventory. To model the height-diameter relationship in naturally developed mixed-species forest stands in order to predict single tree height based on observed diameter at breast height, we applied nonlinear mixed models where we applied the Chapman-Richards and Näslund models as fixed-effects and the influence of the species contribution at the sites as random effects. The fixed-effects followed a set of criteria: (1) height starts at h = 1.3; d = 0; (2) the applied functions are monotonically increasing with a clear inflection point and 3) the fixed-effect model has an asymptotic value) in a naturally developed mixed-species forest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number184
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalForests
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding: The study was conducted at the Estonian University of Life Sciences. The fieldwork and measurements in Järvselja old-growth forest compartment were supported by The Estonian Environmental Investment Centre and Järvselja Training and Experimental Forest Centre. ENFRP measurements were supported by the Estonian State Forest Management Centre, the Estonian Environmental Investment Centre, the European network for observing our changing planet project (ERA-PLANET, grant agreement no. 689443) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program, Estonian Ministry of Sciences projects (grant nos. P180021, P180274), and the Estonian Research Infrastructures Roadmap project Estonian Environmental Observatory (3.2.0304.11-0395).

Funding Information:
The study was conducted at the Estonian University of Life Sciences. The fieldwork and measurements in J?rvselja old-growth forest compartment were supported by The Estonian Environmental Investment Centre and J?rvselja Training and Experimental Forest Centre. ENFRP measurements were supported by the Estonian State Forest Management Centre, the Estonian Environmental Investment Centre, the European network for observing our changing planet project (ERA-PLANET, grant agreement no. 689443) under the European Union?s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program, Estonian Ministry of Sciences projects (grant nos. P180021, P180274), and the Estonian Research Infrastructures Roadmap project Estonian Environmental Observatory (3.2.0304.11-0395). We thank numerous students, fieldwork staff and researchers for their input related to the measurements in J?rvselja old-growth forest and ENFRP.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by the authors.

Keywords

  • Järvselja training and experimental forest centre
  • Natural forest allometry

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