The politics of Latino publics: Immigration reform, political participation and intention to vote

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13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Latinos are the largest U.S. minority group and are poised to play an increasingly important role in U.S. society. Public relations practitioners who work in politics should be interested in what motivates young Latinos to participate in politics. This study reports the findings of a national nonprobability survey with young Latinos (N = 434). The analysis explores how demographic variables, acculturation, political ideology and media use predict perceptions of the importance of immigration reform, reported political participation, and vote likelihood in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Of the dependent variables, findings show that acculturation (β = −0.13) only predicts perceptions of the importance of immigration reform, suggesting acculturation's effects are issue specific. Interest in politics is the largest influential factor in predicting all of the dependent variables.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-257
Number of pages9
JournalPublic Relations Review
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Elsevier Inc.

Keywords

  • Audiences
  • Hispanics
  • Immigration reform
  • Latinos
  • Politics
  • Publics
  • Survey

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