The Physician Rebellion

John E. Kralewski, Bryan E Dowd, Roger D Feldman, Janet Shapiro

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Physicians are becoming increasingly concerned about the controls being placed on their practices by health maintenance organizations (HMOs), preferred-provider organizations, third-party insurance plans, and in some cases, their own group practices. Cost-containment efforts currently have broad social and political support, and physicians are finding that they are no longer the sole decision makers in terms of practice styles. When HMOs and other insurance plans concentrated on the reduction of hospital use and negotiated discounts for hospital services, physicians were concerned but often reluctantly acquiesced, mainly because this process did not directly affect their practices and at times actually helped protect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-342
Number of pages4
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume316
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 5 1987

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Health Maintenance Organizations
Insurance
Physicians
Preferred Provider Organizations
Group Practice
Cost Control

Cite this

The Physician Rebellion. / Kralewski, John E.; Dowd, Bryan E; Feldman, Roger D; Shapiro, Janet.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 316, No. 6, 05.02.1987, p. 339-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Kralewski, John E. ; Dowd, Bryan E ; Feldman, Roger D ; Shapiro, Janet. / The Physician Rebellion. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1987 ; Vol. 316, No. 6. pp. 339-342.
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