The origins of humanitarian intervention in Sudan

Anglo-American missionaries after 1899

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have no other way to conceive of anything which other persons act or suffer, but by recalling and exciting the ideas of what we ourselves are conscious we have found in our own minds; and by … substituting ourselves in their place. Jonathan Edwards, The Nature of True Virtue (1758) During the nineteenth century, the origins of the Anglo-American Protestant missionary spirit were often attributed to the writings of Jonathan Edwards. Composed between 1730 and 1758, his main works discussed the nature of subjective moral discernment. They depicted humans as imprisoned by their sensory perceptions, each objectively disconnected from the other. Without acknowledging this isolating predicament, individuals were prevented from achieving the salvation of grace, and its communal connection. In The Nature of True Virtue (written 1755-8, though not published until 1765), Edwards described conversion as a harmony ‘between individual being and Being in general’. Humans perceived the suffering of others only by ‘recalling and exciting the ideas of what we ourselves are conscious’. The lack of sympathy between unregenerate beings inevitably resulted in warfare and violence. What could be done to prevent common affliction resulting in communal disorder in areas untouched by New Testament theology? If depravity was universal, how could individuals and nations justify intervention in the lives of others, to reduce their miserable lot? By the nineteenth century, Anglo-American missionaries responded to these questions. They outlined the common need for ‘regeneration’: oppressor was to achieve ‘true’ sympathy with the oppressed, persecuted with persecutor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHumanitarian Intervention
Subtitle of host publicationA History
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages283-300
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9780511921292
ISBN (Print)9780521190275
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint

Sympathy
Conscious
Anglo-American
Humanitarian Intervention
Jonathan Edwards
Missionaries
Sudan
Grace
Discernment
Harmony
Regeneration
Person
New Testament
Sensory Perception
Theology
Salvation
Oppressors
Warfare

Cite this

The origins of humanitarian intervention in Sudan : Anglo-American missionaries after 1899. / Mailer, Gideon.

Humanitarian Intervention: A History. Cambridge University Press, 2011. p. 283-300.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Mailer, Gideon. / The origins of humanitarian intervention in Sudan : Anglo-American missionaries after 1899. Humanitarian Intervention: A History. Cambridge University Press, 2011. pp. 283-300
@inbook{2e535d4cc41b474e87a5091fc31093eb,
title = "The origins of humanitarian intervention in Sudan: Anglo-American missionaries after 1899",
abstract = "We have no other way to conceive of anything which other persons act or suffer, but by recalling and exciting the ideas of what we ourselves are conscious we have found in our own minds; and by … substituting ourselves in their place. Jonathan Edwards, The Nature of True Virtue (1758) During the nineteenth century, the origins of the Anglo-American Protestant missionary spirit were often attributed to the writings of Jonathan Edwards. Composed between 1730 and 1758, his main works discussed the nature of subjective moral discernment. They depicted humans as imprisoned by their sensory perceptions, each objectively disconnected from the other. Without acknowledging this isolating predicament, individuals were prevented from achieving the salvation of grace, and its communal connection. In The Nature of True Virtue (written 1755-8, though not published until 1765), Edwards described conversion as a harmony ‘between individual being and Being in general’. Humans perceived the suffering of others only by ‘recalling and exciting the ideas of what we ourselves are conscious’. The lack of sympathy between unregenerate beings inevitably resulted in warfare and violence. What could be done to prevent common affliction resulting in communal disorder in areas untouched by New Testament theology? If depravity was universal, how could individuals and nations justify intervention in the lives of others, to reduce their miserable lot? By the nineteenth century, Anglo-American missionaries responded to these questions. They outlined the common need for ‘regeneration’: oppressor was to achieve ‘true’ sympathy with the oppressed, persecuted with persecutor.",
author = "Gideon Mailer",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/CBO9780511921292.012",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780521190275",
pages = "283--300",
booktitle = "Humanitarian Intervention",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - The origins of humanitarian intervention in Sudan

T2 - Anglo-American missionaries after 1899

AU - Mailer, Gideon

PY - 2011/1/1

Y1 - 2011/1/1

N2 - We have no other way to conceive of anything which other persons act or suffer, but by recalling and exciting the ideas of what we ourselves are conscious we have found in our own minds; and by … substituting ourselves in their place. Jonathan Edwards, The Nature of True Virtue (1758) During the nineteenth century, the origins of the Anglo-American Protestant missionary spirit were often attributed to the writings of Jonathan Edwards. Composed between 1730 and 1758, his main works discussed the nature of subjective moral discernment. They depicted humans as imprisoned by their sensory perceptions, each objectively disconnected from the other. Without acknowledging this isolating predicament, individuals were prevented from achieving the salvation of grace, and its communal connection. In The Nature of True Virtue (written 1755-8, though not published until 1765), Edwards described conversion as a harmony ‘between individual being and Being in general’. Humans perceived the suffering of others only by ‘recalling and exciting the ideas of what we ourselves are conscious’. The lack of sympathy between unregenerate beings inevitably resulted in warfare and violence. What could be done to prevent common affliction resulting in communal disorder in areas untouched by New Testament theology? If depravity was universal, how could individuals and nations justify intervention in the lives of others, to reduce their miserable lot? By the nineteenth century, Anglo-American missionaries responded to these questions. They outlined the common need for ‘regeneration’: oppressor was to achieve ‘true’ sympathy with the oppressed, persecuted with persecutor.

AB - We have no other way to conceive of anything which other persons act or suffer, but by recalling and exciting the ideas of what we ourselves are conscious we have found in our own minds; and by … substituting ourselves in their place. Jonathan Edwards, The Nature of True Virtue (1758) During the nineteenth century, the origins of the Anglo-American Protestant missionary spirit were often attributed to the writings of Jonathan Edwards. Composed between 1730 and 1758, his main works discussed the nature of subjective moral discernment. They depicted humans as imprisoned by their sensory perceptions, each objectively disconnected from the other. Without acknowledging this isolating predicament, individuals were prevented from achieving the salvation of grace, and its communal connection. In The Nature of True Virtue (written 1755-8, though not published until 1765), Edwards described conversion as a harmony ‘between individual being and Being in general’. Humans perceived the suffering of others only by ‘recalling and exciting the ideas of what we ourselves are conscious’. The lack of sympathy between unregenerate beings inevitably resulted in warfare and violence. What could be done to prevent common affliction resulting in communal disorder in areas untouched by New Testament theology? If depravity was universal, how could individuals and nations justify intervention in the lives of others, to reduce their miserable lot? By the nineteenth century, Anglo-American missionaries responded to these questions. They outlined the common need for ‘regeneration’: oppressor was to achieve ‘true’ sympathy with the oppressed, persecuted with persecutor.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84869801581&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84869801581&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/CBO9780511921292.012

DO - 10.1017/CBO9780511921292.012

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9780521190275

SP - 283

EP - 300

BT - Humanitarian Intervention

PB - Cambridge University Press

ER -