The Origin of the Low-Velocity Anomalies Beneath the Rootless Atlas Mountains: Insights Gained From Modeling of Anisotropy Developed by the Travel of Canary Plume

Hwaju Lee, Maximiliano J. Bezada, Young Hee Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

As the mantle plume rises from the deep mantle and reaches the base of a tectonic plate, it changes its traveling direction from vertical to horizontal. The horizontal spread of plume material is often radially asymmetric. An example is a plume found below the Canary Hotspot. Previous studies have suggested that the channeling of the Canary Plume toward the westernmost Mediterranean (Alboran Sea) and consequent lithospheric delamination may have contributed to the low-velocity anomalies found beneath the Moroccan Atlas Mountains. Regional upwelling and edge-driven convection have been proposed as other candidates to explain the origin of the low-velocity anomalies. In this study, we incorporated anisotropy as an a priori constraint in teleseismic P-wave travel-time tomography as mantle flow can develop seismic anisotropy. We inverted a new set of travel-time delays by removing the hypothetical anisotropy-imposed travel-time delays from the observations. Our improved results are more consistent with the hypothesis that the low-velocity anomalies come from the mantle material of the Canary Plume.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere2022JB024622
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth
Volume127
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
H. Lee acknowledges the support from the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF 2021R1A6A3A0108673611) and Y. Kim acknowledges support from the NRF grant funded by the Korean government (MSIT) (2022R1A5A1085103). This work was also partially funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation (EAR-1520695). We would like to thank Joseph Byrnes and Hyunsun Kang for the extensive discussion and comments, and also thank two anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments that helped us to improve the manuscript.

Funding Information:
H. Lee acknowledges the support from the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF 2021R1A6A3A0108673611) and Y. Kim acknowledges support from the NRF grant funded by the Korean government (MSIT) (2022R1A5A1085103). This work was also partially funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation (EAR‐1520695). We would like to thank Joseph Byrnes and Hyunsun Kang for the extensive discussion and comments, and also thank two anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments that helped us to improve the manuscript.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

Keywords

  • Canary Plume
  • Moroccan Atlas
  • low-velocity anomalies
  • mantle dynamics
  • seismic anisotropy
  • teleseismic P-wave tomography

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