The Nosology of Attention-deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Gerald August, BARRY D. GARFINKEL

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24 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined five central issues regarding the classification of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in an epidemiologically derived sample of primary school children. A monothetic schema (DSM-III) differed from a polythetic-only schema (DSM-III-R) by having a higher frequency of comorbid conduct disorder. A pervasive model was too restrictive, identifying only the most severe disruptive or conduct disordered children. Raising the minimum threshold above eight symptoms (DSM-III-R) missed less disruptive children who nevertheless exhibit significant functional impairment. There was minimal support for the independence of a syndrome of attention deficit disorder without hyperactivity (DSM-III). Finally, ADHD patients commonly have other diagnoses, most frequently conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and anxiety disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-165
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Keywords

  • attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • monothetic classification
  • nosology
  • polythetic classification

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