The name game: How naming products increases psychological ownership and subsequent consumer evaluations

Jennifer L. Stoner, Barbara Loken, Ashley Stadler Blank

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Naming products is quite prevalent in American culture; however, we are not aware of any consumer research that explores the effects of this phenomenon. Across three studies, we demonstrate that when consumers name products, their evaluations of those products increase (e.g., attitudes, purchase intentions, and willingness to accept). We find that name fit and creativity as well as subsequent psychological owner-ship drive this effect. We also demonstrate that the naming effect is quite robust—replicating across multiple products, presentation formats, and populations as well as persisting over time. These results contribute to consumer research by opening up a new substantive line of inquiry into the effects of naming products.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-137
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Consumer Psychology
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2018

Keywords

  • Brand management
  • Consumer evaluations
  • Product naming
  • Psychological ownership

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