The Minne-Loppet Motivation Study: An Intervention to Increase Motivation for Outdoor Winter Physical Activity in Ethnically and Racially Diverse Elementary Schools

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To test the effectiveness of an intervention to increase motivation for physical activity in racially diverse third- through fifth-grade students. Design: Natural experiment. Setting: Elementary schools in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Participants: Two hundred ninety-one students in 18 Minne-Loppet Ski Program classes and 210 students in 12 control classrooms from the same schools. Intervention: The Minne-Loppet Ski Program, an 8-week curriculum in elementary schools that teaches healthy physical activity behaviors through cross-country skiing. Measures: Pretest and posttest surveys measured self-determination theory outcomes: intrinsic exercise motivation, intrinsic ski motivation, autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Analysis: Hierarchical linear regression models tested treatment effects controlled for grade, race, sex, and baseline measures of the outcomes. Results: Minne-Loppet program students showed significantly greater motivation to ski (β = 0.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.15-1.75) and significantly greater perceived competence (β = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.06-1.50) than students in control classrooms. Treatment effects for general exercise motivation and perceived competence differed by race. African American students in Minne-Loppet classes showed significantly greater general exercise motivation (β = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.03-2.14) and perceived competence (β = 1.95, 95% CI: 0.91-2.99) than African American students in control classes. Conclusion: The Minne-Loppet program promoted perceived competence and motivation to ski. Future improvements to the Minne-Loppet and similar interventions should aim to build general motivation and provide support needed to better engage all participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1706-1713
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

elementary school
Motivation
Exercise
Students
Mental Competency
confidence
student
Confidence Intervals
African Americans
Linear Models
wintersports
classroom
Skiing
intrinsic motivation
Personal Autonomy
self-determination
Curriculum
autonomy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
regression

Keywords

  • age-specific
  • fitness
  • interventions
  • low income
  • racial minority groups
  • school
  • specific populations
  • specific settings
  • underserved populations
  • young children

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Cite this

@article{9449d804f5a648d28ba85d874be6b683,
title = "The Minne-Loppet Motivation Study: An Intervention to Increase Motivation for Outdoor Winter Physical Activity in Ethnically and Racially Diverse Elementary Schools",
abstract = "Purpose: To test the effectiveness of an intervention to increase motivation for physical activity in racially diverse third- through fifth-grade students. Design: Natural experiment. Setting: Elementary schools in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Participants: Two hundred ninety-one students in 18 Minne-Loppet Ski Program classes and 210 students in 12 control classrooms from the same schools. Intervention: The Minne-Loppet Ski Program, an 8-week curriculum in elementary schools that teaches healthy physical activity behaviors through cross-country skiing. Measures: Pretest and posttest surveys measured self-determination theory outcomes: intrinsic exercise motivation, intrinsic ski motivation, autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Analysis: Hierarchical linear regression models tested treatment effects controlled for grade, race, sex, and baseline measures of the outcomes. Results: Minne-Loppet program students showed significantly greater motivation to ski (β = 0.95, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 0.15-1.75) and significantly greater perceived competence (β = 0.78, 95{\%} CI: 0.06-1.50) than students in control classrooms. Treatment effects for general exercise motivation and perceived competence differed by race. African American students in Minne-Loppet classes showed significantly greater general exercise motivation (β = 1.08, 95{\%} CI: 0.03-2.14) and perceived competence (β = 1.95, 95{\%} CI: 0.91-2.99) than African American students in control classes. Conclusion: The Minne-Loppet program promoted perceived competence and motivation to ski. Future improvements to the Minne-Loppet and similar interventions should aim to build general motivation and provide support needed to better engage all participants.",
keywords = "age-specific, fitness, interventions, low income, racial minority groups, school, specific populations, specific settings, underserved populations, young children",
author = "Miller, {Jonathan M.} and Julian Wolfson and Laska, {Melissa N} and Nelson, {Toben F} and Pereira, {Mark A}",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
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doi = "10.1177/0890117118768119",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
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journal = "American Journal of Health Promotion",
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T2 - An Intervention to Increase Motivation for Outdoor Winter Physical Activity in Ethnically and Racially Diverse Elementary Schools

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AU - Wolfson, Julian

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N2 - Purpose: To test the effectiveness of an intervention to increase motivation for physical activity in racially diverse third- through fifth-grade students. Design: Natural experiment. Setting: Elementary schools in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Participants: Two hundred ninety-one students in 18 Minne-Loppet Ski Program classes and 210 students in 12 control classrooms from the same schools. Intervention: The Minne-Loppet Ski Program, an 8-week curriculum in elementary schools that teaches healthy physical activity behaviors through cross-country skiing. Measures: Pretest and posttest surveys measured self-determination theory outcomes: intrinsic exercise motivation, intrinsic ski motivation, autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Analysis: Hierarchical linear regression models tested treatment effects controlled for grade, race, sex, and baseline measures of the outcomes. Results: Minne-Loppet program students showed significantly greater motivation to ski (β = 0.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.15-1.75) and significantly greater perceived competence (β = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.06-1.50) than students in control classrooms. Treatment effects for general exercise motivation and perceived competence differed by race. African American students in Minne-Loppet classes showed significantly greater general exercise motivation (β = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.03-2.14) and perceived competence (β = 1.95, 95% CI: 0.91-2.99) than African American students in control classes. Conclusion: The Minne-Loppet program promoted perceived competence and motivation to ski. Future improvements to the Minne-Loppet and similar interventions should aim to build general motivation and provide support needed to better engage all participants.

AB - Purpose: To test the effectiveness of an intervention to increase motivation for physical activity in racially diverse third- through fifth-grade students. Design: Natural experiment. Setting: Elementary schools in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Participants: Two hundred ninety-one students in 18 Minne-Loppet Ski Program classes and 210 students in 12 control classrooms from the same schools. Intervention: The Minne-Loppet Ski Program, an 8-week curriculum in elementary schools that teaches healthy physical activity behaviors through cross-country skiing. Measures: Pretest and posttest surveys measured self-determination theory outcomes: intrinsic exercise motivation, intrinsic ski motivation, autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Analysis: Hierarchical linear regression models tested treatment effects controlled for grade, race, sex, and baseline measures of the outcomes. Results: Minne-Loppet program students showed significantly greater motivation to ski (β = 0.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.15-1.75) and significantly greater perceived competence (β = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.06-1.50) than students in control classrooms. Treatment effects for general exercise motivation and perceived competence differed by race. African American students in Minne-Loppet classes showed significantly greater general exercise motivation (β = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.03-2.14) and perceived competence (β = 1.95, 95% CI: 0.91-2.99) than African American students in control classes. Conclusion: The Minne-Loppet program promoted perceived competence and motivation to ski. Future improvements to the Minne-Loppet and similar interventions should aim to build general motivation and provide support needed to better engage all participants.

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