The metabolic syndrome and cognitive decline in the atherosclerosis risk in communities study (ARIC)

Jennifer L. Dearborn, David Knopman, A. Richey Sharrett, Andrea L C Schneider, Clifford R. Jack, Laura H. Coker, Alvaro Alonso, Elizabeth Selvin, Thomas H. Mosley, Lynne E. Wagenknecht, Beverly G. Windham, Rebecca F. Gottesman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Methods: 10,866 participants aged 45-64 years at baseline were assessed for MetS and completed cognitive testing at two later time points (3 and 9 years from the baseline visit).

Results: MetS is associated with increased odds of low cognitive performance in the domains of executive function and word fluency, but not with 6-year cognitive decline. Individual MetS components explained this association (hypertension, diabetes, low HDL, elevated triglycerides and increased waist circumference).

Background: Midlife metabolic syndrome (MetS) may impact cognitive health as a construct independently of hypertension, hyperlipidemia and other components.

Conclusions: A focus on the individual risk factors as opposed to MetS during midlife is important to reduce the incidence of cognitive impairment in later life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-346
Number of pages10
JournalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Volume38
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 7 2014

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Cognitive decline
  • Dementia
  • Hypertension
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Obesity

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