THE LEECH EXOPLANET IMAGING SURVEY: ORBIT AND COMPONENT MASSES OF THE INTERMEDIATE-AGE, LATE-TYPE BINARY NO UMa

Joshua E. Schlieder, Andrew J. Skemer, Anne Lise Maire, Silvano Desidera, Philip Hinz, Michael F. Skrutskie, Jarron Leisenring, Vanessa Bailey, Denis Defrère, Simone Esposito, Klaus G. Strassmeier, Michael Weber, Beth A. Biller, Mickaël Bonnefoy, Esther Buenzli, Laird M. Close, Justin R. Crepp, Josh A. Eisner, Karl Heinz Hofmann, Thomas HenningKatie M. Morzinski, Dieter Schertl, Gerd Weigelt, Charles E. Woodward

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    16 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    We present high-resolution Large Binocular Telescope LBTI/LMIRcam images of the spectroscopic and astrometric binary NO UMa obtained as part of the LBT Interferometer Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt exoplanet imaging survey. Our H-, Ks-, and L′-band observations resolve the system at angular separations <0.″09. The components exhibit significant orbital motion over a span of ∼7 months. We combine our imaging data with archival images, published speckle interferometry measurements, and existing spectroscopic velocity data to solve the full orbital solution and estimate component masses. The masses of the K2.0 ± 0.5 primary and K6.5 ± 0.5 secondary are 0.83 ± 0.02 M and 0.64 ± 0.02 M, respectively. We also derive a system distance of d = 25.87 ± 0.02 pc and revise the Galactic kinematics of NO UMa. Our revised Galactic kinematics confirm NO UMa as a nuclear member of the ∼500 Myr old Ursa Major moving group, and it is thus a mass and age benchmark. We compare the masses of the NO UMa binary components to those predicted by five sets of stellar evolution models at the age of the Ursa Major group. We find excellent agreement between our measured masses and model predictions with little systematic scatter between the models. NO UMa joins the short list of nearby, bright, late-type binaries having known ages and fully characterized orbits.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article number1
    JournalAstrophysical Journal
    Volume818
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Feb 10 2016

    Bibliographical note

    Funding Information:
    We thank the anonymous referee for their constructive review that improved the quality of this manuscript. We thank the LBTI/LMIRcam instrument team for providing support during LEECH observations. A portion of the research of J.E.S. was supported by an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program at NASA Ames Research Center, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA. Support for A.J.S. was provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through Hubble Fellowship grant HST-HF2-51349 awarded by the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract NAS 5-26555. A.-L.M. and S.D. acknowledge support from the "Progetti Premiali" funding scheme of the Italian Ministry of Education, University, and Research. E.B. is supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF). LEECH is funded by the NASA Origins of Solar Systems Program, grant NNX13AJ17G. The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer is funded by NASA as part of its Exoplanet Exploration program. LMIRcam is funded by the National Science Foundation through grant NSF AST-0705296. STELLA was made possible by funding through the State of Brandenburg (MWFK) and the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). The facility is a collaboration of the AIP in Brandenburg with the IAC in Tenerife. This research has made use of the SIMBAD database, operated at CDS, Strasbourg, France. This publication makes use of data products from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, which is a joint project of the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation. This research has made use of the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA), which is operated by the W. M. Keck Observatory and the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI), under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Facilities: LBT(LBTI/LMIRcam).

    Keywords

    • binaries: general
    • instrumentation: adaptive optics
    • stars: fundamental parameters
    • stars: individual (NO UMa)
    • stars: late-type
    • techniques: high angular resolution

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