The Korean diasporic experience: Measuring ethnic identity in the United States and China

Richard M. Lee, Toni Falbo, Hyun Sim Doh, Seong Yeon Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

The measurement and development of ethnic identity of Koreans living in the United States and China were examined in the context of different migration experiences. Three hundred sixteen undergraduate college students were administered the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM; J. S. Phinney, 1992). Separate principal-component analysis for each sample was performed to create cross-culturally equivalent Ethnic Identity and Other-Group subscales. Differential item function analysis revealed no cultural item bias among the retained MEIM items. Korean Americans had higher scores on the Ethnic Identity and Other-Group subscales and were more likely to be classified as bicultural than were Korean Chinese. Korean Chinese were more likely to be classified as assimilated, traditional, or marginalized in their cultural orientation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-216
Number of pages10
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 29 2001

Keywords

  • Diaspora
  • Ethnic identity
  • Korean American
  • Korean Chinese

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