The inverse association between a fish consumption biomarker and gingival inflammation and periodontitis: A population-based study

Filip Ottosson, Lina Hultgren, Celine Fernandez, Gunnar Engström, Marju Orho-Melander, Cecilia Kennbäck, Margaretha Persson, Ryan T. Demmer, Olle Melander, Björn Klinge, Peter M. Nilsson, Daniel Jönsson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aim: The metabolite 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionic acid (CMPF) is a fatty fish–intake biomarker. We investigated the association between plasma levels of CMPF in relation to gingival inflammation and periodontitis case definition, as well as the extent and severity variables. Materials and Methods: The Malmö Offspring Study is a population-based study, and the Malmö Offspring Dental Study (MODS) is its dental arm, including periodontal charting. Plasma CMPF was measured using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and studied in relation to periodontal diagnosis and parameters using multivariable linear or logistic regression modelling adjusting for age, sex, education, body mass index, fasting glucose, and smoking. Results: Metabolite data were available for 922 MODS participants. Higher CMPF levels were associated with less gingival inflammation (β = −2.12, p =.002) and lower odds of severe periodontitis (odds ratio [OR] = 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56 to 0.98). Higher CMPF levels were also associated with more teeth (β = 0.19, p =.001), lower number of periodontal pockets (≥4 mm) (β = −1.07, p =.007), and lower odds of having two or more periodontal pockets of ≥6 mm (OR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.65 to 0.98) in fully adjusted models. Conclusions: CMPF, a validated biomarker of fatty fish consumption, is associated with less periodontal inflammation and periodontitis. Residual confounding cannot be ruled out, and future studies are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-361
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of clinical periodontology
Volume49
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Malmö Offspring Dental Study (MODS) was supported by grants from Oral Health Related Research by Region Skåne, the Crafoord Foundation, the Albert Påhlsson Foundation, and the Public Dental Service of Skåne. Malmö Offspring Study (MOS) was supported by the Research Council of Sweden, the Heart and Lung Foundation, and the Region Skåne County Council (ALF) grant. The authors would like to extend their gratitude to the following people working within the MODS study: the dentists, who examined the participants, (Liselott Bennvid, Elisabeth Hansson, Demir Cirgic, and Elisabeth Larsson) and biomedical scientists and nurses (Johanna Karlsson, Anna Hallberg, Christina Neroth, Anders Holm, and Ingegärd Lundgren Svensson). We are also profoundly grateful to the MOS/MODS participants for their participation in this research.

Funding Information:
Malmö Offspring Dental Study (MODS) was supported by grants from Oral Health Related Research by Region Skåne, the Crafoord Foundation, the Albert Påhlsson Foundation, and the Public Dental Service of Skåne. Malmö Offspring Study (MOS) was supported by the Research Council of Sweden, the Heart and Lung Foundation, and the Region Skåne County Council (ALF) grant. The authors would like to extend their gratitude to the following people working within the MODS study: the dentists, who examined the participants, (Liselott Bennvid, Elisabeth Hansson, Demir Cirgic, and Elisabeth Larsson) and biomedical scientists and nurses (Johanna Karlsson, Anna Hallberg, Christina Neroth, Anders Holm, and Ingegärd Lundgren Svensson). We are also profoundly grateful to the MOS/MODS participants for their participation in this research.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Periodontology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Keywords

  • CMPF
  • fish diet
  • gingival inflammation
  • metabolomics
  • periodontitis
  • Humans
  • Periodontitis/diagnosis
  • Inflammation
  • Periodontal Pocket
  • Gingivitis
  • Multiple Organ Failure
  • Animals
  • Biomarkers

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Journal Article

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