The intersections of culture and power in clinician and interpreter relationships: A qualitative study

Emily Becher, Elizabeth Wieling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ongoing racial/ethnic health disparities place increasing emphasis on the importance of interpreters in mental health treatment. Yet there is a limited body of research examining how interpreters and clinicians work together in delivering care. This article used an ethno-culturally informed qualitative procedure to ask interpreters and clinicians about their experiences in cross-language mental health treatment. Seventeen semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 interpreters and 7 clinicians. The interplay of power was experienced differently by interpreters and clinicians as exemplified by 3 categories of meaning: Interpreters speaking out, The relationship matters, and Who has the power? The authors recommend future research focus on the clinician-interpreter relationship as an essential piece of cross-cultural mental health delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)450-457
Number of pages8
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

Keywords

  • Interpreters
  • Mental health care
  • Power and privilege
  • Qualitative research
  • Relationships

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