The interactive effects of social dominance orientation, group status, and perceived stability on favoritism for high-status groups

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Abstract

Two studies examined the interactive effects of social dominance orientation (SDO), group status, and perceived stability on various manifestations of favoritism for high-status groups: (1) an analysis of survey data from a sample of UCLA students, and (2) an analogous experimental study using a modified version of the minimal-group paradigm. Results of these studies offered general support for the hypothesis that high-SDO members of low-status groups would only favor high-status groups when the system of hierarchy was perceived to be stable (i.e. impervious to change), although findings were somewhat less clear-cut in the experimental study. Implications for social dominance theory and other theories of intergroup behavior are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-143
Number of pages25
JournalGroup Processes and Intergroup Relations
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • False consciousness
  • Group status
  • Minimal groups
  • Social dominance orientation
  • Stability

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