The innate host response in caries and periodontitis

Joerg Meyle, Henrik Dommisch, Sabine Groeger, Rodrigo A. Giacaman, Massimo Costalonga, Mark C Herzberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Innate immunity rapidly defends the host against infectious insults. These reactions are of limited specificity and exhaust without providing long-term protection. Functional fluids and effector molecules contribute to the defence against infectious agents, drive the immune response, and direct the cellular players. Aim: To review the literature and present a summary of current knowledge about the function of tissues, cellular players and soluble mediators of innate immunity relevant to caries and periodontitis. Methods: Historical and recent literature was critically reviewed based on publications in peer-reviewed scientific journals. Results: The innate immune response is vital to resistance against caries and periodontitis and rapidly attempts to protect against infectious agents in the dental hard and soft tissues. Soluble mediators include specialized proteins and lipids. They function to signal to immune and inflammatory cells, provide antimicrobial resistance, and also induce mechanisms for potential repair of damaged tissues. Conclusions: Far less investigated than adaptive immunity, innate immune responses are an emerging scientific and therapeutic frontier. Soluble mediators of the innate response provide a network of signals to organize the near immediate molecular and cellular response to infection, including direct and immediate antimicrobial activity. Further studies in human disease and animal models are generally needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1215-1225
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Periodontology
Volume44
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Periodontitis
Innate Immunity
Animal Disease Models
Adaptive Immunity
Cellular Immunity
Publications
Tooth
Lipids
Infection
Proteins
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • caries
  • hard tissues
  • innate host response
  • periodontitis
  • soft tissues review

Cite this

The innate host response in caries and periodontitis. / Meyle, Joerg; Dommisch, Henrik; Groeger, Sabine; Giacaman, Rodrigo A.; Costalonga, Massimo; Herzberg, Mark C.

In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Vol. 44, No. 12, 01.12.2017, p. 1215-1225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meyle, Joerg ; Dommisch, Henrik ; Groeger, Sabine ; Giacaman, Rodrigo A. ; Costalonga, Massimo ; Herzberg, Mark C. / The innate host response in caries and periodontitis. In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology. 2017 ; Vol. 44, No. 12. pp. 1215-1225.
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