The influence of dual-identity development on the psychosocial functioning of African-American gay and bisexual men

Isiaah Crawford, Kevin W. Allison, Brian D. Zamboni, Tomas Soto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

187 Scopus citations

Abstract

To examine the influence of racial-ethnic and sexual identity development on the psychosocial functioning of African-American gay and bisexual men (AAGBM), 174 AAGBM completed questionnaire packets designed to assess their levels of racial-ethnic and sexual identity development, self-esteem, social support, male gender role stress, HIV prevention selfefficacy, psychological distress, and life satisfaction. The results indicate that AAGBM who possess more positive (i.e., integrated) self-identification as being African American and gay reported higher levels of self-esteem, HIV prevention self-efficacy, stronger social support networks, greater levels of life satisfaction, and lower levels of male gender role and psychological distress than their counterparts who reported less positive (i.e., less well integrated) African-American and gay identity development. Although higher levels of racial-ethnic identity development were associated with greater levels of life satisfaction, sexual identity development was not.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-189
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Sex Research
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2002

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