The Importance of Temperament for Understanding Early Manifestations of Autism Spectrum Disorder in High-Risk Infants

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Abstract

The present study investigated the relationship between infant temperament characteristics and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk status. Temperament was examined at 6, 12, and 24 months in 282 infants at high familial risk for ASD and 114 low-risk controls using the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised and Early Childhood Behavior Questionnaire. Infants were divided into three groups at 24 months: High-Risk Positive—classified as ASD (HR Pos), High-Risk Negative (HR Neg), and Low-Risk Negative (LR Neg). At 6 and 12 months HR Pos infants exhibited lower Surgency and Regulatory Capacity than LR Neg infants. By 12 months they also demonstrated increased Negative Affect. Group differences remained, when early signs of ASD were controlled for, suggesting that temperament differences could be useful targets for understanding the development of ASD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2849-2863
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume49
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by Grants from NIH/NIHCD (R01-HD055741, HD055741-S1) Autism Speaks, and the Simons Foundation to J. Piven and K01-MH101653 to J. Wolff. We sincerely thank our IBIS families for participating in this research. We are grateful to Robert Emerson for helpful comments on an earlier version of this manuscript. * IBIS Network: The IBIS (Infant Brain Imaging Study) Network is an NIH funded Autism Centers of Excellence project and consists of a consortium of 8 Universities in the U.S. and Canada. Clinical Sites: University of North Carolina: J. Piven (IBIS Network PI), H.C. Hazlett, C. Chappell; University of Washington: S. Dager, A. Estes, D. Shaw; Washington University: K. N. Botteron, R. C. McKinstry, J. Constantino, J. Pruett; Children?s Hospital of Philadelphia: R. T. Schultz, S. Paterson; University of Alberta: L. Zwaigenbaum; University of Minnesota: J. Elison. Data Coordinating Center: Montreal Neurological Institute: A.C. Evans, D. L. Collins, G. B. Pike, V. Fonov, P. Kostopoulos, S. Das. Image Processing Core: New York University: G. Gerig; University of North Carolina: M. Styner. Statistical Analysis Core: University of North Carolina: H. Gu.

Funding Information:
This study was funded by National Institutes of Health (R01-HD 055741, R01-HD055741-S1, K01-MH101653) and the Simons Foundation (SFARI Grant 140209) and Autism Speaks.

Funding Information:
This study was supported by Grants from NIH/NIHCD (R01-HD055741, HD055741-S1) Autism Speaks, and the Simons Foundation to J. Piven and K01-MH101653 to J. Wolff. We sincerely thank our IBIS families for participating in this research. We are grateful to Robert Emerson for helpful comments on an earlier version of this manuscript. * IBIS Network: The IBIS (Infant Brain Imaging Study) Network is an NIH funded Autism Centers of Excellence project and consists of a consortium of 8 Universities in the U.S. and Canada. Clinical Sites: University of North Carolina: J. Piven (IBIS Network PI), H.C. Hazlett, C. Chappell; University of Washington: S. Dager, A. Estes, D. Shaw; Washington University: K. N. Botteron, R. C. McKinstry, J. Constantino, J. Pruett; Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia: R. T. Schultz, S. Paterson; University of Alberta: L. Zwaigenbaum; University of Minnesota: J. Elison. Data Coordinating Center: Montreal Neurological Institute: A.C. Evans, D. L. Collins, G. B. Pike, V. Fonov, P. Kostopoulos, S. Das. Image Processing Core: New York University: G. Gerig; University of North Carolina: M. Styner. Statistical Analysis Core: University of North Carolina: H. Gu.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Infancy
  • Temperament

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