The impact of information from similar or different advisors on judgment

Francesca Gino, Jen Shang, Rachel Croson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

People rely on others' advice to make judgments on a daily basis. In three studies, we examine the differential impacts of similarity between the source of that advice and the person making the judgment in two settings: judging others' behavior and judging one's own actions. We find that similarity interacts with the target of the judgment. In particular, information received from a different advisor is more heavily weighed than from a similar advisor in judging others' actions, but information from a similar advisor is more heavily weighed than from a different advisor in judging one's own. We provide two potential explanations for this interaction, difficulty of the judgment and informativeness of the advice. Our analyses show a moderated mediating role of informativeness and difficulty in the relationship between the advisor's similarity by judgment type interaction and advice use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-302
Number of pages16
JournalOrganizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
Volume108
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009

Keywords

  • Advice taking
  • Difficulty
  • Informativeness
  • Judgment
  • Similarity

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