The Impact of Gender Differences in Attitudes and Beliefs Concerning HBV Vaccination and Screening in the Lao Community

Odichinma Akosionu, Beth Virnig, Kathleen T. Call, Jian Min Yuan, Sunny Chanthanouvong, Ruby H N Nguyen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Liver cancer incidence is increasing among Asian Americans. Laotians in the US have greater risk of liver cancer death compared to other Asian American groups. However, ethnicity is not the only disparity; Laotian men are at increased risk of liver cancer compared to Laotian women. Use of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination and screening is low among Laotians. The impact of gender differences in attitudes and beliefs concerning HBV vaccination and screening is unknown. This secondary analysis of a cross-sectional community-based participatory research study. Although men were more likely to believe that infection with HBV is preventable, and treatable, causes liver cancer, and that healthy persons should be vaccinated, of those who thought people should get vaccinated, women were four times more likely to receive vaccine than men (adj. OR 4.0, CI 1.2–19). Understanding and addressing gender differences may increase HBV screening and vaccination uptake, thus reducing disparities within the Laotian community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-281
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Hepatitis B virus (HBV)
  • Laotian
  • Screening
  • Vaccination

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