The impact of experiential avoidance and obsessive beliefs on obsessive-compulsive symptoms in a severe clinical sample

Rachel C. Manos, Shawn P. Cahill, Chad T. Wetterneck, Christine A. Conelea, Ashley R. Ross, Bradley C. Riemann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study sought to replicate and extend a study by Abramowitz et al. (2009), who examined how well experiential avoidance (EA) and obsessive beliefs predicted obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms in a non-clinical sample. The current study utilized a severe, clinical, treatment-seeking sample (N=108), and examined how well EA and obsessive beliefs predicted changes in OC symptoms from pre- to post-treatment. Findings were generally consistent with Abramowitz et al. EA was generally not related to OC severity and did not add significantly to the prediction of OC symptom domains above and beyond depression or general anxiety, whereas obsessive beliefs did. Pre- to post-treatment change in one type of obsessive belief (perfectionism/certainty), but not change in EA, predicted global change in OC severity. Results suggest that EA as it is measured currently may not play a significant role in OC severity or changes in OC severity across treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)700-708
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010

Keywords

  • Experiential avoidance
  • Obsessive beliefs
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder

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