The impact of early interpersonal experiences on adult romantic relationship functioning: Recent findings from the Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Risk and Adaptation: Recent findings from the minnesota longitudinal study of risk and adaptation

Jeffry A. Simpson, W. Andrew Collins, Jessica E. Salvatore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adopting an organizational view on social development, we have investigated how interpersonal experiences early in life predict how well individuals will resolve relationship conflicts, recover from conflicts, and have stable, satisfying relationships with their romantic partners in early adulthood. We have also identified specific interpersonal experiences during middle childhood and adolescence that mediate the connection between how individuals regulated their emotions with their parents very early in life and how they do so as young adults in their romantic relationships. We discuss the many advantages of adopting an organizational view on social development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-359
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Directions in Psychological Science
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by grants from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to Byron Egeland, L. Alan Sroufe, and W. Andrew Collins ( R01-MH40864 ) and to Jeffry A. Simpson (R01- MH49599); a National Institute for Child Health and Human Development grant to W. Andrew Collins, Byron Egeland, and L. Alan Sroufe (R01-HD054850); and an NIMH pre-doctoral training grant to Jessica E. Salvatore (T32-MH015755-32).

Keywords

  • conflict recovery
  • conflict resolution
  • early experience
  • romantic relationships
  • weak-link status

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