The impact of a brief cessation induction intervention for waterpipe tobacco smoking: A pilot randomized clinical trial

Eleanor L.S. Leavens, Ellen Meier, Alayna P. Tackett, Mary Beth Miller, Noor N. Tahirkheli, Emma I. Brett, Dana M. Carroll, Leslie M. Driskill, Michael P. Anderson, Theodore L. Wagener

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Waterpipe (WP) tobacco smoking delivers many of the same harmful toxicants as cigarette smoking and is on the rise in the US. This study evaluated the feasibility and efficacy of a brief personalized feedback intervention in affecting changes in WP smoking among current WP smokers. Methods Participants (N = 109) were recruited as they entered WP lounges and completed a questionnaire and exhaled carbon monoxide (eCO) testing before entering the WP lounge. Participants were cluster-randomized to assessment-only control (AOC) or intervention conditions. The intervention condition received health risk information and personalized feedback on pre- and post-WP session eCO levels. Participants completed a survey at the end of the WP session and at 3-month follow-up. Results Compared to control, the intervention was effective in increasing knowledge of WP-related harms, correcting risk perceptions, increasing importance of quitting WP smoking, and increasing confidence in ability to quit WP smoking at post-WP session (p < 0.05). Differences were maintained for knowledge of WP-related harms, risk perceptions, and commitment to quitting WP at 3-month follow-up; however, no significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed in WP smoking (i.e., days smoked and number of WPs smoked) at 3-month follow-up between the intervention (M = 3.97 days, SD = 9.83; M = 6.45 bowls, SD = 19.60) and control conditions (M = 3.32 days, SD = 5.24; M = 3.49 bowls, SD = 5.10). Conclusions The current research supports the use of personalized feedback as a useful intervention method to increase commitment to quit WP, but suggests more intensive interventions may be necessary to achieve WP cessation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-100
Number of pages7
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume78
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

Keywords

  • Cessation
  • Intervention
  • Smoking
  • Waterpipe

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    Leavens, E. L. S., Meier, E., Tackett, A. P., Miller, M. B., Tahirkheli, N. N., Brett, E. I., Carroll, D. M., Driskill, L. M., Anderson, M. P., & Wagener, T. L. (2018). The impact of a brief cessation induction intervention for waterpipe tobacco smoking: A pilot randomized clinical trial. Addictive Behaviors, 78, 94-100. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.10.023