The gender gap in company job training

David Knoke, Yoshito Ishio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous analyses of employee participation in company-provided job training programs, using cross-sectional data on cumulative incidence levels, found either that men receive more training than women or no significant gender differences. The authors conducted event-history analyses of the hazard rate of entry into initial firm training programs by a national cohort of young workers. Rather than closing the gender gap, the women's training disadvantage widened after controlling for theoretically important human capital, occupational, industrial, organizational, and family-stage variables. Further examination of women's and men's distributions on these independent variables and estimates of separate event-history equations suggest that gender segregation by occupation and industry, workweek length, and family role obligations afford men better training opportunities than women. The authors conclude with suggestions for future research and speculations about the policy implications for closing the persistent gender gap in company-provided job training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-167
Number of pages27
JournalWork and Occupations
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1998

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gender
training program
young worker
training opportunities
event
history
speculation
human capital
segregation
gender-specific factors
obligation
occupation
incidence
employee
firm
examination
participation
Gender gap
Job training
industry

Cite this

The gender gap in company job training. / Knoke, David; Ishio, Yoshito.

In: Work and Occupations, Vol. 25, No. 2, 05.1998, p. 141-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Knoke, David ; Ishio, Yoshito. / The gender gap in company job training. In: Work and Occupations. 1998 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 141-167.
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