The End of Religion? Examining the Role of Religiousness, Materialism, and Long-Term Orientation on Consumer Ethics in Indonesia

Denni Arli, Fandy Tjiptono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

Various studies on the impact of religiousness on consumer ethics have produced mixed results and suggested further clarification on the issue. Therefore, this article examines the effect of religiousness, materialism, and long-term orientation on consumer ethics in Indonesia. The results from 356 respondents in Indonesia, the largest Muslim population in the world, showed that intrinsic religiousness positively affected consumer ethics, while extrinsic social religiousness negatively affected consumer ethics. However, extrinsic personal religiousness did not affect consumer ethical beliefs dimensions. Unlike other studies in developed countries, materialism and long-term orientation influenced only a few of the consumer ethical beliefs dimensions in this study. To date, the study is one of the first empirical studies to explore the impact of religiousness on consumer ethics in Indonesia. The study contributes to the debate on the impact of religiousness on consumer ethics and can assist managers and public policymakers in their effort to mitigate unethical consumer activities in Indonesia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-400
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Business Ethics
Volume123
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Consumer ethics
  • Indonesia
  • Long-term orientation
  • Materialism
  • Religiousness

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