The Empirical Structure of Narrative Identity: The Initial Big Three

Kate C. McLean, Moin Syed, Monisha Pasupathi, Jonathan M. Adler, William L. Dunlop, David Drustrup, Robyn Fivush, Matthew E. Graci, Jennifer P. Lilgendahl, Jennifer Lodi-Smith, Dan P. McAdams, Tara P. McCoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A robust empirical literature suggests that individual differences in the thematic and structural aspects of life narratives are associated with and predictive of psychological well-being. However, 1 limitation of the current field is the multitude of ways of capturing these narrative features, with little attention to overarching dimensions or latent factors of narrative that are responsible for these associations with well-being. In the present study we uncovered a reliable structure that accommodates commonly studied features of life narratives in a large-scale, multi-university collaborative effort. Across 3 large samples of emerging and midlife adults responding to various narrative prompts (N = 855 participants, N = 2,565 narratives), we found support for 3 factors of life narratives: motivational and affective themes, autobiographical reasoning, and structural aspects. We also identified a "functional" model of these 3 factors that reveals a reduced set of narrative features that adequately captures each factor. Additionally, motivational and affective themes was the factor most reliably related to well-being. Finally, associations with personality traits were variable by narrative prompt. Overall, the present findings provide a comprehensive and robust model for understanding the empirical structure of narrative identity as it relates to well-being, which offers meaningful theoretical contributions to the literature, and facilitates practical decision making for researchers endeavoring to capture and quantify life narratives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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narrative
well-being
Individuality
Personality
Decision Making
Research Personnel
Psychology
personality traits
decision making
university

Keywords

  • Life stories
  • Narrative identity
  • Personality structure
  • Well-being

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

The Empirical Structure of Narrative Identity : The Initial Big Three. / McLean, Kate C.; Syed, Moin; Pasupathi, Monisha; Adler, Jonathan M.; Dunlop, William L.; Drustrup, David; Fivush, Robyn; Graci, Matthew E.; Lilgendahl, Jennifer P.; Lodi-Smith, Jennifer; McAdams, Dan P.; McCoy, Tara P.

In: Journal of personality and social psychology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McLean, KC, Syed, M, Pasupathi, M, Adler, JM, Dunlop, WL, Drustrup, D, Fivush, R, Graci, ME, Lilgendahl, JP, Lodi-Smith, J, McAdams, DP & McCoy, TP 2019, 'The Empirical Structure of Narrative Identity: The Initial Big Three', Journal of personality and social psychology. https://doi.org/10.1037/pspp0000247
McLean, Kate C. ; Syed, Moin ; Pasupathi, Monisha ; Adler, Jonathan M. ; Dunlop, William L. ; Drustrup, David ; Fivush, Robyn ; Graci, Matthew E. ; Lilgendahl, Jennifer P. ; Lodi-Smith, Jennifer ; McAdams, Dan P. ; McCoy, Tara P. / The Empirical Structure of Narrative Identity : The Initial Big Three. In: Journal of personality and social psychology. 2019.
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