'The emperor lost his clothes': Rupert Murdoch, News of the World and journalistic boundary work in the UK and USA

Matt Carlson, Dan Berkowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Episodes of journalistic deviancy become moments of reflection for the journalistic interpretive community, at times assuming international proportions. This study examines the construction of appropriate journalistic norms through reactions to the phone hacking scandal that led to the abrupt closure of the British Sunday tabloid the News of the World on 10 July 2011. A comparison of reactions in US and UK newspapers reveals how boundary work articulates appropriate practices through defining deviant behavior. Rather than isolating the troubles to a single newsroom, what emerges is a form of synecdochic deviancy in which the significance of the scandal expands to larger normative questions among journalists in both nations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)389-406
Number of pages18
JournalJournalism
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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scandal
news
deviant behavior
journalist
newspaper
community
Deviancy
Boundary Work
Scandal
Clothes
Emperor
News
Rupert Murdoch
Closure
Hacking
Sunday
Tabloids
Journalists
Phone
Proportion

Keywords

  • Boundary work
  • Interpretive communities
  • Journalism
  • News of the World
  • Rupert Murdoch

Cite this

'The emperor lost his clothes' : Rupert Murdoch, News of the World and journalistic boundary work in the UK and USA. / Carlson, Matt; Berkowitz, Dan.

In: Journalism, Vol. 15, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 389-406.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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