The emergency public relations protocol: How to work effectively on controversial projects in an academic health setting

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Certain research topics - including studies of sexual behavior, substance use, and HIV risk - are more likely to be scrutinized by the media and groups opposed to this area of research. When studying topics that others might deem controversial, it is critical that researchers anticipate potential negative media events prior to their occurrence. By developing an Emergency Public Relations Protocol at the genesis of a study, researchers can identify and plan for events that might result in higher scrutiny. For each identified risk, a good protocol details procedures to enact before, during, and after a media event. This manuscript offers recommendations for developing a protocol based on both Situational Crisis Communication Theory and our experience as an HIV prevention research group who recently experienced such an event. The need to have procedures in place to monitor and address social media is highlighted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalSexuality Research and Social Policy
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

Keywords

  • Crisis communication
  • Media attack
  • Public relations
  • Social media

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