The effects of outcome expectations and satisfaction on weight loss and maintenance: Correlational and experimental analyses - A randomized trial

Emily A. Finch, Jennifer A. Linde, Robert W. Jeffery, Alexander J. Rothman, Christie M. King, Rona L. Levy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

73 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines the hypothesis that highly favorable outcome expectations promote weight loss and hinder weight maintenance. To investigate the effects of outcome expectations and satisfaction with treatment outcomes on weight loss, 349 adults were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 weight loss programs that emphasize either (a) an "optimistic" message, focusing exclusively on the positive aspects of weight loss, or (b) a "balanced" message, giving equal time to positive and negative aspects of weight loss. Participants changed their weight loss cognitions in response to the intervention, but there was no significant difference between the intervention treatment groups in short-term or long-term (18-month) weight loss. Independent of treatment message, positive outcome expectations and satisfaction were both associated with weight loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)608-616
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2005

Keywords

  • Obesity
  • Outcome expectations
  • Psychosocial factors
  • Satisfaction
  • Weight loss

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