The effects of both recent and long-term selection and genetic drift are readily evident in North American barley breeding populations

Ana M. Poets, Mohsen Mohammadi, Kiran Seth, Hongyun Wang, Thomas J.Y. Kono, Zhou Fang, Gary J. Muehlbauer, Kevin P. Smith, Peter L. Morrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Barley was introduced to North America ~400 yr ago but adaptation to modern production environments is more recent. Comparisons of allele frequencies among growth habits and spike (inflorescence) types in North America indicate that significant genetic differentiation has accumulated in a relatively short evolutionary time span. Allele frequency differentiation is greatest among barley with two-row vs. six-row spikes, followed by spring vs. winter growth habit. Large changes in allele frequency among breeding programs suggest a major contribution of genetic drift and linked selection on genetic variation. Despite this, comparisons of 3613 modern North American cultivated barley breeding lines that differ for spike-type and growth habit permit the discovery of 142 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) outliers putatively linked to targets of selection. For example, SNPs within the Cbf4, Ppd-H1, and Vrn-H1 loci, which have previously been associated with agronomically adaptive phenotypes, are identified as outliers. Analysis of extended haplotype sharing identifies genomic regions shared within and among breeding populations, suggestive of a number of genomic regions subject to recent selection. Finally, we are able to identify recent bouts of gene flow between breeding populations that could point to the sharing of agronomically adaptive variation. These results are supported by pedigrees and breeders' understanding of germplasm sharing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)609-622
Number of pages14
JournalG3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • Breeding
  • Evolution of crops
  • Genetics
  • Identity by state
  • Introgression

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