The Effects of a Beef-Based Meal Compared to a Calorie Matched Bean-Based Meal on Appetite and Food Intake

Angela L. Bonnema, Deena Altschwager, William Thomas, Joanne L. Slavin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Protein and fiber have strong satiety-inducing potential. Beef is a high quality, protein-rich food. Beans contain moderate levels of protein as well as fiber. To determine the effects of a high protein meal (beef) compared to a moderate protein, high fiber meal (beans) on subjective appetite and energy intake at a subsequent meal twenty-eight adults, 14 men (ages 24 ± 5 y, BMI 23 ± 2 kg/m2) and 14 women (ages 25 ± 5 y, BMI 22 ± 2 kg/m2) consumed 2 test lunches containing a "meatloaf" made from either beef or beans. The beef meal provided 26 g of protein and 3 g of fiber while the bean meal provided 17 g of protein and 12 g of fiber. An ad libitum snack was given 3 h after the test meal. Visual analogue scales were used to assess hunger, satiety, fullness, and prospective food intake. Gastrointestinal (GI) tolerance was assessed over 24 h. No difference between the beef and bean was observed for appetite ratings over 3 h, food intake at the subsequent meal (632 ± 75 kcal compared with 611 ± 75 kcal, respectively), or sum of GI score (2.2 ± 0.5 compared with 2.9 ± 0.5, respectively). Gas and bloating were reported more often after the bean meal than the beef meal (2.0 ± 0.4 compared with 1.3 ± 0.4, P value 0.057). A beef-based meal with high protein and a bean-based meal with moderate protein and high fiber produced similar satiety, while the bean-based meal resulting in higher, yet moderate, gas and bloating.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2088-2093
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Food Science
Volume80
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Appetite
appetite
meals (menu)
Meals
food intake
beans
beef
Eating
dietary fiber
bean meal
proteins
satiety
Proteins
gases
Red Meat
lunch
test meals
Gases
snacks
hunger

Keywords

  • Beans
  • Beef
  • Fiber
  • Food intake
  • Protein
  • Satiety

Cite this

The Effects of a Beef-Based Meal Compared to a Calorie Matched Bean-Based Meal on Appetite and Food Intake. / Bonnema, Angela L.; Altschwager, Deena; Thomas, William; Slavin, Joanne L.

In: Journal of Food Science, Vol. 80, No. 9, 01.01.2015, p. 2088-2093.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bonnema, Angela L. ; Altschwager, Deena ; Thomas, William ; Slavin, Joanne L. / The Effects of a Beef-Based Meal Compared to a Calorie Matched Bean-Based Meal on Appetite and Food Intake. In: Journal of Food Science. 2015 ; Vol. 80, No. 9. pp. 2088-2093.
@article{489bbc16d5dc48e9b6e3e773a8ef1728,
title = "The Effects of a Beef-Based Meal Compared to a Calorie Matched Bean-Based Meal on Appetite and Food Intake",
abstract = "Protein and fiber have strong satiety-inducing potential. Beef is a high quality, protein-rich food. Beans contain moderate levels of protein as well as fiber. To determine the effects of a high protein meal (beef) compared to a moderate protein, high fiber meal (beans) on subjective appetite and energy intake at a subsequent meal twenty-eight adults, 14 men (ages 24 ± 5 y, BMI 23 ± 2 kg/m2) and 14 women (ages 25 ± 5 y, BMI 22 ± 2 kg/m2) consumed 2 test lunches containing a {"}meatloaf{"} made from either beef or beans. The beef meal provided 26 g of protein and 3 g of fiber while the bean meal provided 17 g of protein and 12 g of fiber. An ad libitum snack was given 3 h after the test meal. Visual analogue scales were used to assess hunger, satiety, fullness, and prospective food intake. Gastrointestinal (GI) tolerance was assessed over 24 h. No difference between the beef and bean was observed for appetite ratings over 3 h, food intake at the subsequent meal (632 ± 75 kcal compared with 611 ± 75 kcal, respectively), or sum of GI score (2.2 ± 0.5 compared with 2.9 ± 0.5, respectively). Gas and bloating were reported more often after the bean meal than the beef meal (2.0 ± 0.4 compared with 1.3 ± 0.4, P value 0.057). A beef-based meal with high protein and a bean-based meal with moderate protein and high fiber produced similar satiety, while the bean-based meal resulting in higher, yet moderate, gas and bloating.",
keywords = "Beans, Beef, Fiber, Food intake, Protein, Satiety",
author = "Bonnema, {Angela L.} and Deena Altschwager and William Thomas and Slavin, {Joanne L.}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/1750-3841.12991",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "80",
pages = "2088--2093",
journal = "Journal of Food Science",
issn = "0022-1147",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Effects of a Beef-Based Meal Compared to a Calorie Matched Bean-Based Meal on Appetite and Food Intake

AU - Bonnema, Angela L.

AU - Altschwager, Deena

AU - Thomas, William

AU - Slavin, Joanne L.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Protein and fiber have strong satiety-inducing potential. Beef is a high quality, protein-rich food. Beans contain moderate levels of protein as well as fiber. To determine the effects of a high protein meal (beef) compared to a moderate protein, high fiber meal (beans) on subjective appetite and energy intake at a subsequent meal twenty-eight adults, 14 men (ages 24 ± 5 y, BMI 23 ± 2 kg/m2) and 14 women (ages 25 ± 5 y, BMI 22 ± 2 kg/m2) consumed 2 test lunches containing a "meatloaf" made from either beef or beans. The beef meal provided 26 g of protein and 3 g of fiber while the bean meal provided 17 g of protein and 12 g of fiber. An ad libitum snack was given 3 h after the test meal. Visual analogue scales were used to assess hunger, satiety, fullness, and prospective food intake. Gastrointestinal (GI) tolerance was assessed over 24 h. No difference between the beef and bean was observed for appetite ratings over 3 h, food intake at the subsequent meal (632 ± 75 kcal compared with 611 ± 75 kcal, respectively), or sum of GI score (2.2 ± 0.5 compared with 2.9 ± 0.5, respectively). Gas and bloating were reported more often after the bean meal than the beef meal (2.0 ± 0.4 compared with 1.3 ± 0.4, P value 0.057). A beef-based meal with high protein and a bean-based meal with moderate protein and high fiber produced similar satiety, while the bean-based meal resulting in higher, yet moderate, gas and bloating.

AB - Protein and fiber have strong satiety-inducing potential. Beef is a high quality, protein-rich food. Beans contain moderate levels of protein as well as fiber. To determine the effects of a high protein meal (beef) compared to a moderate protein, high fiber meal (beans) on subjective appetite and energy intake at a subsequent meal twenty-eight adults, 14 men (ages 24 ± 5 y, BMI 23 ± 2 kg/m2) and 14 women (ages 25 ± 5 y, BMI 22 ± 2 kg/m2) consumed 2 test lunches containing a "meatloaf" made from either beef or beans. The beef meal provided 26 g of protein and 3 g of fiber while the bean meal provided 17 g of protein and 12 g of fiber. An ad libitum snack was given 3 h after the test meal. Visual analogue scales were used to assess hunger, satiety, fullness, and prospective food intake. Gastrointestinal (GI) tolerance was assessed over 24 h. No difference between the beef and bean was observed for appetite ratings over 3 h, food intake at the subsequent meal (632 ± 75 kcal compared with 611 ± 75 kcal, respectively), or sum of GI score (2.2 ± 0.5 compared with 2.9 ± 0.5, respectively). Gas and bloating were reported more often after the bean meal than the beef meal (2.0 ± 0.4 compared with 1.3 ± 0.4, P value 0.057). A beef-based meal with high protein and a bean-based meal with moderate protein and high fiber produced similar satiety, while the bean-based meal resulting in higher, yet moderate, gas and bloating.

KW - Beans

KW - Beef

KW - Fiber

KW - Food intake

KW - Protein

KW - Satiety

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84941743194&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84941743194&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/1750-3841.12991

DO - 10.1111/1750-3841.12991

M3 - Article

C2 - 26270740

AN - SCOPUS:84941743194

VL - 80

SP - 2088

EP - 2093

JO - Journal of Food Science

JF - Journal of Food Science

SN - 0022-1147

IS - 9

ER -