The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder in a frontline service setting

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Abstract

The goal of the current study was to test the generalizability of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in a frontline service setting. Twenty-nine patients who presented to treatment clinics with problematic worry were provided CBT for GAD. Among the intent-to-treat sample, there were no significant changes in worry or depression from pre- to posttreatment. Treatment completers showed significant pre- to posttreatment reductions on measures of worry and depression. The magnitude of change was smaller than has been reported in randomized control trials (RCTs). Although the frontline service setting differed from RCT settings in multiple ways, treatment completers nonetheless achieved moderate to large decreases in self-reported worry and depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)192-198
Number of pages7
JournalCognitive Behaviour Therapy
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Keywords

  • Anxiety disorders
  • Benchmarking
  • Brief psychotherapy
  • Delivery of health care
  • Dissemination
  • Effectiveness

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