The effect of the medial olivocochlear reflex on click-evoked otoacoustic emissions during psychoacoustic forward-masking tasks

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Measurements of otoacoustic emissions in animals have shown that the effects of efferent activation are greater in attentive than in anesthetized animals suggesting that the MOCR effects can be modulated by attention. In this study, the effect of efferent activation was measured in humans using click-evoked otoacoustic emissions while listeners were performing a psychoacoustic forward-masking task. Each trial within a block started with a sequence of 40-dB pSPL clicks presented at a rate of 40 Hz that were followed by a 200-ms harmonic-complex masker. The masker was immediately followed by a 10-ms tonal probe and another click train. The listeners' task was to detect the probe. A constant stimuli method was used to measure performance in the forward-masking task, with the probe presented at seven randomized levels around the predetermined masked threshold. Catch trials were dispersed randomly throughout the block. Click trains before and after the masker-signal segments were recorded from the ear canal and analyzed to extract effects of efferent activation at different levels of difficulty of the psychoacoustic task. The results will be discussed with respect to the role of attention and the role of the MOCR in forward masking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number050094
JournalProceedings of Meetings on Acoustics
Volume19
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 19 2013
Event21st International Congress on Acoustics, ICA 2013 - 165th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America - Montreal, QC, Canada
Duration: Jun 2 2013Jun 7 2013

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of the medial olivocochlear reflex on click-evoked otoacoustic emissions during psychoacoustic forward-masking tasks'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this