The Effect of Self-Control on Attentional Bias for Alcohol Cues in Male Heavy Drinkers

Hanneke A. Teunissen, Renske Spijkerman, Tim M. Schoenmakers, Kathleen D. Vohs, Rutger C.M.E. Engels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Attentional bias for alcohol cues increases craving and subsequent alcohol consumption. Override processes can be used to disengage attention from alcohol cues. This requires self-control and implies that depletion of self-control would impair the ability to disengage attention from alcohol cues. This study examined the effect of self-control on attentional bias among male heavy drinkers. To manipulate self-control resources, an expression control task was used. Attentional bias was measured with a visual probe task. The Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS; Anton, Moak, & Latham, 1996) assessed the urge to drink and persistent thoughts about alcohol. The results suggest that participants who scored relatively high on the OCDS showed more attentional bias after controlled emotional expression, compared to free emotional expression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)776-792
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

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