The effect of domestic work on girls' schooling: Evidence from Egypt

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    27 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In Egypt, girls' work primarily takes the form of domestic tasks, which are not considered in many studies of child labor. This paper investigates the effect of girls' work on their school attendance. It uses a modified bivariate probit approach to estimate the effect of work on schooling while allowing for the simultaneous determination of the two outcomes. It presents evidence that the substantial burden of girls' domestic work leads to lower rates of school attendance. Policies that attempt to ban the labor-force work of children will have practically no effect on girls' education in Egypt, while interventions reducing the drudgery of household labor through, for example, improved water and sanitation infrastructure, have better prospects for success.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)79-128
    Number of pages50
    JournalFeminist Economics
    Volume16
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

    Fingerprint

    Egypt
    school attendance
    evidence
    child labor
    ban
    labor force
    infrastructure
    labor
    water
    Domestic Work
    Schooling
    education
    School Attendance
    Labor
    School attendance

    Keywords

    • Child labor
    • Domestic work
    • Egypt
    • Gender
    • Household economics
    • Schooling

    Cite this

    The effect of domestic work on girls' schooling : Evidence from Egypt. / Assaad, Ragui; Levison, Deborah; Zibani, Nadia.

    In: Feminist Economics, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 79-128.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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