The effect of bushmeat consumption on migratory wildlife in the Serengeti ecosystem, Tanzania

Dennis Rentsch, Craig Packer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Bushmeat hunting is a threat to wildlife populations in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, including to migratory wildebeest Connochaetes taurinus and other wildlife populations in the Serengeti ecosystem. Accurate assessments of offtake through bushmeat hunting are necessary to determine whether hunting pressure on the wildebeest population is unsustainable. We used a panel dataset of local bushmeat consumption to measure offtake of wildlife and examine the long-term threat to the Serengeti wildebeest population. Based on these data we estimate an annual offtake of 97,796-140,615 wildebeest (6-10% of the current population), suggesting that previous estimates based on ecological models underestimated the effect of poaching on these populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-294
Number of pages8
JournalORYX
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 4 2015

Keywords

  • Bushmeat
  • Connochaetes taurinus
  • Consumption
  • Human population growth
  • Offtake
  • Serengeti
  • Wildebeest migration

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of bushmeat consumption on migratory wildlife in the Serengeti ecosystem, Tanzania'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this