The development of conscious control in childhood

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Abstract

Developmental data suggest that the growth of executive function in childhood can be understood in terms of the development of consciousness. According to the 'levels of consciousness' (LOC) model, there are age-related increases in the highest degree of self-reflection or LOC that children are able to muster in response to situational demands. These increases in LOC with age have consequences for the quality of experience, the potential for recall, the complexity of children's explicit knowledge structures, and the possibility of the conscious control of thought, emotion, and action. The hierarchical LOCs identified by this analysis are also useful for understanding the complex structure of conscious experience in adults, and they provide a metric for measuring the level at which consciousness is operating in specific situations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12-17
Number of pages6
JournalTrends in Cognitive Sciences
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Consciousness
Executive Function
Emotions
Growth

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The development of conscious control in childhood. / Zelazo, Philip D.

In: Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 12-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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