The contribution of interpersonal violence victimization types to psychological distress among youth

Lynette M. Renner, Laura M. Schwab-Reese, Elizabeth C. Coppola, Shamra Boel-Studt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Associations between different types of victimization and symptomology among youth remain unclear due to methodological limitations preventing the identification of the independent contribution of each type of violence. Objective: The purpose was to examine associations between different types of victimization and the odds of experiencing clinically significant levels of anxiety, depression, and anger/aggression. We also examined the unique contribution of each type of victimization to these outcomes. Participants: Participants were a nationally representative sample of youth ages 10–17 (n = 1019) who were residing in the United States when data were collected in 2002–2003. Methods: Youth reported on their experiences of different forms of victimization (e.g., physical abuse, emotional abuse, neglect, sibling abuse, bullying, sexual assault, and witnessing violence) within the past year. Logistic regression and relative weights analyses were used to examine associations between victimization and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and anger/aggression. Results: The prevalence of reported victimization ranged from 1.3 % for neglect to 41.3% for sibling abuse. Physical and emotional child abuse, sibling abuse, bullying, and emotional bullying were associated with increased odds of clinically significant anxiety, depression, and anger/aggression. Witnessing parent intimate partner violence was associated with increased odds of clinically significant anger/aggression. Witnessing parental assault of a sibling was associated with increased odds of clinically significant anxiety and anger/aggression. Emotional bullying predicted the largest percentage of variance in anxiety and depression, followed by emotional abuse and sibling aggression. Conclusions: These findings underscore the need for further assessment and treatment for sibling abuse and emotional bullying.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number104493
JournalChild Abuse and Neglect
Volume106
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Psychological distress
  • Victimization
  • Violence
  • Youth

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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