The confluence of perfectionism, body dissatisfaction, and low self-esteem predicts bulimic symptoms: Clinical implications

Anna M. Bardone, Kathleen D. Vohs, Lyn Y. Abramson, Todd F. Heatherton, Thomas E. Joiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

We present a brief overview of empirically supported risk factors of bulimic behavior. We then propose an empirically supported, interactive, three-factor model of bulimic symptom occurrence from which we derive clinical implications for assessment, treatment, and prevention. Our research finds that perfectionism, body dissatisfaction, and self-esteem interact to predict bulimic symptoms. In particular, women who consider themselves overweight and who have elevated levels of perfectionism and lower levels of self-esteem show the greatest risk for bulimic symptoms. Thus, our model identifies three theoretically related targets for intervention: perfectionism, body dissatisfaction, and low self-esteem. Assessment of these factors is recommended. The extent to which cognitive-behavioral therapy for hulimia and interpersonal therapy for bulimia address these factors is reviewed and evaluated, and theory-based recommendations are made for prevention efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-280
Number of pages16
JournalBehavior Therapy
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The confluence of perfectionism, body dissatisfaction, and low self-esteem predicts bulimic symptoms: Clinical implications'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this