The Canadian Dermatology Workforce Survey

Implications for the future of Canadian dermatology - Who will be your skin expert?

Sheilagh Maguiness, Gordon E. Searles, Lynn From, Susan Swiggum

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To survey Canadian dermatologists for specialty-specific physician resource information including demographics, workload and future career plans. Background and methods: In 2001, the Canadian Dermatology Association (CDA) surveyed 555 dermatologists in Canada to gain specialty-specific physician resource information. Three hundred and seventy-one dermatologists (69%) provided information about themselves, their workloads and their future career goals. Results: The average Canadian dermatologist is 52 years old and 35% of practicing dermatologists are over the age of 55. Eighty-nine percent of dermatologists practice in an urban setting, 19% include practice in a rural setting while less than 0.5% practice in remote areas. Canadian dermatologists spend 61% of their clinical time providing services in Medical Dermatology. Within 5 years, 50% of dermatologists reported that they plan to reduce their practices or retire. Conclusion: The Canadian Dermatology Workforce Survey provides a snapshot of the current practice of dermatology in Canada. It also serves to highlight the critical shortage of dermatologists, which will continue to worsen without immediate, innovative planning for the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-147
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

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Dermatology
Skin
Workload
Canada
Physicians
Surveys and Questionnaires
Dermatologists
Demography

Cite this

The Canadian Dermatology Workforce Survey : Implications for the future of Canadian dermatology - Who will be your skin expert? / Maguiness, Sheilagh; Searles, Gordon E.; From, Lynn; Swiggum, Susan.

In: Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 8, No. 3, 01.06.2004, p. 141-147.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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