The atrial natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR-A/GC-A) is dephosphorylated by distinct microcystin-sensitive and magnesium-dependent protein phosphatases

Paula M. Bryan, Lincoln R. Potter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A is the primary signaling receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide. Ligand binding to NPR-A rapidly activates its guanylyl cyclase domain, but its rate of cGMP synthesis declines with time. This waning of activity is called homologous desensitization and is mediated in part by receptor dephosphorylation. Here, we characterize two distinct NPR-A phosphatase activities. The serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitor, microcystin, inhibited the desensitization of NPR-A in membrane guanylyl cyclase assays in the absence of magnesium. EDTA also inhibited the desensitization, whereas MgCl2 stimulated the desensitization. Because the effects of microcystin and EDTA were additive, and microcystin did not block the magnesium-dependent desensitization, the targets for these agents appear to be distinct. Incubation of membranes at 37°C stimulated the dephosphorylation of NPR-A, and microcystin blocked the temperature-dependent dephosphorylation. The addition of MgCl2 or MnCl2, but not CaCl2, further stimulated the dephosphorylation of NPR-A, and microcystin failed to inhibit this process. The desensitization required changes in the phosphorylation state of NPR-A because the guanylyl cyclase activity of a receptor variant containing glutamate substitutions at all six phosphorylation sites was unaffected by MgCl2, EDTA, or microcystin. Together, these data indicate that NPR-A is regulated by two distinct phosphatases, possibly including a member of the protein phosphatase 2C family. Finally, we observed that the desensitization of NPR-A in membranes from mouse kidneys and NIH3T3 cells was increased by prior exposure to atrial natriuretic peptide, suggesting that hormone binding enhances receptor dephosphorylation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16041-16047
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume277
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - May 3 2002

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