The Association Between Protein Intake by Source and Osteoporotic Fracture in Older Men: A Prospective Cohort Study

for the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Research Group

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26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dietary protein is a potentially modifiable risk factor for fracture. Our objectives were to assess the association of protein intake with incident fracture among older men and whether these associations varied by protein source or by skeletal site. We studied a longitudinal cohort of 5875 men (mean age 73.6 ± 5.9 years) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study. At baseline, protein intake was assessed as percent of total energy intake (TEI) with mean intake from all sources = 16.1%TEI. Incident clinical fractures were confirmed by physician review of medical records. There were 612 major osteoporotic fractures, 806 low-trauma fractures, 270 hip fractures, 193 spine fractures, and 919 non-hip non-spine fractures during 15 years of follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazards models with age, race, height, clinical site, TEI, physical activity, marital status, osteoporosis, gastrointestinal surgery, smoking, oral corticosteroids use, alcohol consumption, and calcium and vitamin D supplements as covariates to compute hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), all expressed per unit (SD = 2.9%TEI) increase. Higher protein intake was associated with a decreased risk of major osteoporotic fracture (HR = 0.92; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.00) with a similar association found for low-trauma fracture. The association between protein and fracture varied by protein source; eg, increased dairy protein and non-dairy animal protein were associated with a decreased risk of hip fracture (HR = 0.80 [95% CI, 0.65 to 0.98] and HR = 0.84 [95% CI, 0.72 to 0.97], respectively), whereas plant-source protein was not (HR = 0.99 [95% CI, 0.78 to 1.24]). The association between protein and fracture varied by fracture site; total protein was associated with a decreased risk of hip fracture (HR = 0.84 [95% CI, 0.73 to 0.95]), but not clinical spine fracture (HR = 1.06 [95% CI, 0.92 to 1.22]). In conclusion, those with high protein intake (particularly high animal protein intake) as a percentage of TEI have a lower risk of major osteoporotic fracture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)592-600
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Bone and Mineral Research
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study is supported by National Institutes of Health funding. The following institutes provide support: the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), and NIH Roadmap for Medical Research under the following grant numbers: U01 AG027810, U01 AG042124, U01 AG042139, U01 AG042140, U01 AG042143, U01 AG042145, U01 AG042168, U01 AR066160, and UL1 TR000128. This manuscript is the result of work supported with resources and use of facilities of the Minneapolis VA Health Care System. Authors? roles: Study design and conduct: LL, JMS, PMC, JAC, ESO, and KEE. Data collection: JMS, PMC, JAC, ESO, and KEE. Data analysis: LL and TNV. Data interpretation: LL, JMS, PMC, JAC, BCT, TNV, DCB, ESO, JTS, and KEE. Drafting and revising manuscript: LL, JMS, and KEE. Critical review and approval of manuscript: LL, JMS, PMC, JAC, BCT, TNV, DCB, ESO, JTS, and KEE. LL takes responsibility for the integrity of the data analysis.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research

Keywords

  • EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • FRACTURE PREVENTION
  • METABOLISM
  • NUTRITION
  • OSTEOPOROSIS

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