The association between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and myelodysplastic syndromes in the Adults in Minnesota with Myelodysplastic Syndromes (AIMMS) Study

Aubrey K. Hubbard, Michaela Richardson, Michelle A. Rosesler, Adina Cioc, Phuong L. Nguyen, Erica Warlick, Jenny N. Poynter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of blood disorders. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with a chemopreventive effect in some cancers. We evaluated associations between NSAID use and MDS in a population-based case-control study. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Secondary analyses stratified by sex and MDS subtype were also conducted.The analysis included 399 MDS cases and 698 controls. No significant associations between MDS and use of aspirin (OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.67–1.14), ibuprofen (OR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.64–1.30), acetaminophen (OR = 1.29, 95% CI 0.90–1.84) or NSAIDs overall (OR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.68–1.23) were observed. No significant associations were observed in models stratified by sex or MDS subtype; however, the direction of the effect between NSAID use and MDS varied by MDS subtype. Our results do not support an association between NSAID use and MDS overall.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalLeukemia and Lymphoma
Volume62
Issue number6
Early online dateJan 8 2021
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The study was funded by a National Institutes of Health grant [R01 CA142714 to J.N.P] and supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health [T32 CA099936 to A.K.H].

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The association between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and myelodysplastic syndromes in the Adults in Minnesota with Myelodysplastic Syndromes (AIMMS) Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this