The air emissions from broiler buildings in California

X. J. Lin, E. Cortus, R. Zhang, S. Jiang, A. J. Heber

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper reports the emission rates of gases and particulate matter (PM) from two California broiler buildings that were monitored from September 2007 to October 2009 in the National Air Emission Monitoring Study. Each of the two identical buildings housed 21,000 broilers with a 45-day growth cycle and market weight of 2.7 kg. The litter was completely cleaned out every three growth cycles. The building environment was controlled by 11 ventilation fans, 2 evaporative cooling cells, and 17 heaters. During two-years of continuous emission measurement, gas and particulate matter concentrations and ventilation rate were continuously measured. The results show that the mean emission rates of ammonia and carbon dioxide were 0.49 and 76.1 g/hd-d, and emission rates of hydrogen sulfide, methane, nitrous oxide, and ethanol were 2.89, 46.5, 4.27 and 16.3 mg/hd-d, respectively. The mean emission rates of PM2.5, PM 10 and total suspended particulate were 5.35, 44.0 and 120 mg/hd-d, respectively. The emission rates increased with broiler growth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASABE - International Symposium on Air Quality and Waste Management for Agriculture 2010
Pages189-196
Number of pages8
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010
EventInternational Symposium on Air Quality and Waste Management for Agriculture 2010 - Dallas, TX, United States
Duration: Sep 13 2010Sep 16 2010

Publication series

NameASABE - International Symposium on Air Quality and Waste Management for Agriculture 2010

Other

OtherInternational Symposium on Air Quality and Waste Management for Agriculture 2010
CountryUnited States
CityDallas, TX
Period9/13/109/16/10

Keywords

  • Ammonia
  • Ethanol
  • Greenhouse gases
  • Hydrogen sulfide
  • Particulate matter
  • Ventilation rates

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