The 1899 cuban marriage law controversy: Church, state and empire in the crucible of nation

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Abstract

In this essay, a battle over canon and civil marriage that took place during the first U.S. occupation of Cuba, 1899-1902, is examined. The controversy surrounded the publication of a marriage law that declared that henceforth only civil marriages would be recognized by the state. The debate is discussed from the point of view of three key sets of actors: the Cuban nationalists who championed the law, the outraged Catholic prelates who opposed it, and the U.S. military administrators who ultimately decided the outcome of the controversy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)469-494+550
JournalJournal of Social History
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

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