Testing a Religiously Tailored Intervention with Somali American Muslim Women and Somali American Imams to Increase Participation in Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening

Rebekah Pratt, Sharif Mohamed, Wali Dirie, Nimo Ahmed, Sey Lee, Michael VanKeulen, Sam Carlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Somali American women have low rates of breast and cervical screening. This research aimed to test the feasibility and impact of religiously tailored workshops involving Somali American Muslim women and male imams to improve intention to undergo breast or cervical cancer screening. Religiously tailored workshops addressing cancer screening (each approximately 3 h in length) were conducted with 30 Somali American women and 11 imams. Pre- and post-test surveys measured attitudes toward screening, screening intention, and workshop experience. The workshops were feasible, and both the women and the imams found the workshops enjoyable as well as informative. The discussions of religiously tailored messages had a positive impact on attitudes toward cancer screening, and, for the women, a positive impact on intention to screen. Religiously tailored messages can be an important community asset for engaging Somali American Muslim women around the value of breast and cervical cancer screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-95
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2020

Keywords

  • Breast
  • Cancer screening
  • Cervical
  • Focus group
  • Immigrant
  • Muslim
  • Qualitative
  • Religious
  • Somali

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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