Testing a Brief Scale Format Self-affirmation Induction for Use in Health Communication Research and Practice

Xuan Zhu, Marco Yzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Research on self-affirmation has potential to inform the field’s understanding of health message resistance and acceptance. However, widely used self-affirmation instruments have several disadvantages that can lead to inconsistent success in generating self-affirmation and thus may explain inconsistent self-affirmation effects, or at the very least make their use cumbersome. In a series of three sequential studies, we introduced and tested a brief attribute scale format self-affirmation induction (brief scale affirmation task, or B-SAT) that was based on the 32-item attribute scale self-affirmation induction developed by Napper, Harris, and Epton. Using different behavioral contexts, we compared the performance of the B-SAT with that of two widely used self-affirmation inductions, i.e., the value essay task and the 32-item attribute scale. From a convergent validity perspective, the B-SAT performed as effectively as the two existing inductions in making people aware of their cherished and desirable values. From a predictive validity perspective, the B-SAT reduced defensive responses to a self-relevant health message and improved instrumental attitude toward the recommended behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)178-197
Number of pages20
JournalCommunication Methods and Measures
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2019

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Testing a Brief Scale Format Self-affirmation Induction for Use in Health Communication Research and Practice. / Zhu, Xuan; Yzer, Marco.

In: Communication Methods and Measures, Vol. 13, No. 3, 03.07.2019, p. 178-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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