Tensile strength of thermally modified laminated strand lumber and laminated veneer lumber

Matthew D. Aro, Xiping Wang, Dwight E. McDonald, Marshall Begel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Laminated strand lumber (LSL) and laminated veneer lumber (LVL) were thermally modified as a post-treatment at 140°C, 150°C, 160°C, 170°C, and 180°C. The tension modulus of elasticity (MOE) of LSL was not significantly impacted by the treatments, with the 180°C treatment group exhibiting the highest tension MOE (11.8 GPa). The LVL also experienced minimal impacts, with the 150°C treatment group having the highest tension MOE (19.4 GPa) and the 160°C treatment group exhibiting the lowest (17.1 GPa). The maximum tensile strength (MTS) of the LSL and LVL significantly decreased with increasing temperatures, with the control and 180°C treatment groups experiencing the highest and lowest MTS, respectively. The lowest MTS for LSL was 10.8 MPa (180°C treatment), which was 70% lower than the controls. The lowest MTS of the LVL was 24.4 MPa (also at the 180°C treatment), which was a 49% decrease compared to the controls. These results suggest that thermal-modification post-treatments minimally impact tension MOE, but can significantly reduce MTS at higher treatment temperatures. Combined with previous work improving the moisture properties and equilibrium moisture content of thermally modified LSL and LVL, it may be possible to optimize the treatment technique(s) to yield products with desirable properties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)228-235
Number of pages8
JournalWood Material Science and Engineering
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 8 2017

Keywords

  • Engineered wood
  • modified wood
  • thermally modified wood

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