Temporal and spatial variability in water quality of wetlands in the Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN metropolitan area: Implications for monitoring strategies and designs

Naomi E. Detenbeck, Debra L. Taylor, Ann Lima, Cynthia A Hagley

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22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Temporal and spatial variability in wetland water-quality variables were examined for twenty-one wetlands in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area and eighteen wetlands in adjacent Wright County. Wetland water quality was significantly affected by contact with the sediment (surface water vs. groundwater), season, degree of hydrologic isolation, wetland class, and predominant land-use in the surrounding watershed (p < 0.05). Between years, only nitrate and particulate nitrogen concentrations varied significantly in Wright County wetland surface waters. For eight water-quality variables, the power of a paired before-and-after comparison design was greater than the power of a completely randomized design. The reverse was true for four other water-quality variables. The power of statistical tests for different classes of water-quality variables could be ranked according to the predominant factors influencing these: climate factors > edaphic factors > detritivory > land-use factors > biotic-redox or other multiple factors. For two wetlands sampled intensively, soluble reactive phosphate and total dissolved phosphorus were the most spatially variable (c.v = 76-249%), while temperature, color, dissolved organic carbon, and DO were least variable (c.v. = 6-43%). Geostatistical analyses demonstrated that the average distance across which water-quality variables were spatially correlated (variogram range) was 61-112% of the mean radius of each wetland. Within the shallower of the two wetlands, nitrogen speciation was explained as a function of dissolved oxygen, while deeper marsh water-quality variables were explained as a function of water depth or distance from the wetland edge. Compositing water-quality samples produced unbiased estimates of individual sample means for all water quality variables examined except for ammonium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-40
Number of pages30
JournalEnvironmental Monitoring and Assessment
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 11 1996

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Wetlands
metropolitan area
Water quality
wetland
water quality
Monitoring
monitoring
Land use
detritivory
land use
variogram
Dissolved oxygen
Organic carbon
Watersheds
Surface waters
Ammonium Compounds
Phosphorus
dissolved organic carbon
marsh
Groundwater

Cite this

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title = "Temporal and spatial variability in water quality of wetlands in the Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN metropolitan area: Implications for monitoring strategies and designs",
abstract = "Temporal and spatial variability in wetland water-quality variables were examined for twenty-one wetlands in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area and eighteen wetlands in adjacent Wright County. Wetland water quality was significantly affected by contact with the sediment (surface water vs. groundwater), season, degree of hydrologic isolation, wetland class, and predominant land-use in the surrounding watershed (p < 0.05). Between years, only nitrate and particulate nitrogen concentrations varied significantly in Wright County wetland surface waters. For eight water-quality variables, the power of a paired before-and-after comparison design was greater than the power of a completely randomized design. The reverse was true for four other water-quality variables. The power of statistical tests for different classes of water-quality variables could be ranked according to the predominant factors influencing these: climate factors > edaphic factors > detritivory > land-use factors > biotic-redox or other multiple factors. For two wetlands sampled intensively, soluble reactive phosphate and total dissolved phosphorus were the most spatially variable (c.v = 76-249{\%}), while temperature, color, dissolved organic carbon, and DO were least variable (c.v. = 6-43{\%}). Geostatistical analyses demonstrated that the average distance across which water-quality variables were spatially correlated (variogram range) was 61-112{\%} of the mean radius of each wetland. Within the shallower of the two wetlands, nitrogen speciation was explained as a function of dissolved oxygen, while deeper marsh water-quality variables were explained as a function of water depth or distance from the wetland edge. Compositing water-quality samples produced unbiased estimates of individual sample means for all water quality variables examined except for ammonium.",
author = "Detenbeck, {Naomi E.} and Taylor, {Debra L.} and Ann Lima and Hagley, {Cynthia A}",
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T1 - Temporal and spatial variability in water quality of wetlands in the Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN metropolitan area

T2 - Implications for monitoring strategies and designs

AU - Detenbeck, Naomi E.

AU - Taylor, Debra L.

AU - Lima, Ann

AU - Hagley, Cynthia A

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N2 - Temporal and spatial variability in wetland water-quality variables were examined for twenty-one wetlands in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area and eighteen wetlands in adjacent Wright County. Wetland water quality was significantly affected by contact with the sediment (surface water vs. groundwater), season, degree of hydrologic isolation, wetland class, and predominant land-use in the surrounding watershed (p < 0.05). Between years, only nitrate and particulate nitrogen concentrations varied significantly in Wright County wetland surface waters. For eight water-quality variables, the power of a paired before-and-after comparison design was greater than the power of a completely randomized design. The reverse was true for four other water-quality variables. The power of statistical tests for different classes of water-quality variables could be ranked according to the predominant factors influencing these: climate factors > edaphic factors > detritivory > land-use factors > biotic-redox or other multiple factors. For two wetlands sampled intensively, soluble reactive phosphate and total dissolved phosphorus were the most spatially variable (c.v = 76-249%), while temperature, color, dissolved organic carbon, and DO were least variable (c.v. = 6-43%). Geostatistical analyses demonstrated that the average distance across which water-quality variables were spatially correlated (variogram range) was 61-112% of the mean radius of each wetland. Within the shallower of the two wetlands, nitrogen speciation was explained as a function of dissolved oxygen, while deeper marsh water-quality variables were explained as a function of water depth or distance from the wetland edge. Compositing water-quality samples produced unbiased estimates of individual sample means for all water quality variables examined except for ammonium.

AB - Temporal and spatial variability in wetland water-quality variables were examined for twenty-one wetlands in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area and eighteen wetlands in adjacent Wright County. Wetland water quality was significantly affected by contact with the sediment (surface water vs. groundwater), season, degree of hydrologic isolation, wetland class, and predominant land-use in the surrounding watershed (p < 0.05). Between years, only nitrate and particulate nitrogen concentrations varied significantly in Wright County wetland surface waters. For eight water-quality variables, the power of a paired before-and-after comparison design was greater than the power of a completely randomized design. The reverse was true for four other water-quality variables. The power of statistical tests for different classes of water-quality variables could be ranked according to the predominant factors influencing these: climate factors > edaphic factors > detritivory > land-use factors > biotic-redox or other multiple factors. For two wetlands sampled intensively, soluble reactive phosphate and total dissolved phosphorus were the most spatially variable (c.v = 76-249%), while temperature, color, dissolved organic carbon, and DO were least variable (c.v. = 6-43%). Geostatistical analyses demonstrated that the average distance across which water-quality variables were spatially correlated (variogram range) was 61-112% of the mean radius of each wetland. Within the shallower of the two wetlands, nitrogen speciation was explained as a function of dissolved oxygen, while deeper marsh water-quality variables were explained as a function of water depth or distance from the wetland edge. Compositing water-quality samples produced unbiased estimates of individual sample means for all water quality variables examined except for ammonium.

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