Temperature-Driven Developmental Modulation of Yield Response to Nitrogen in Wheat and Maize

Victor O. Sadras, Nicolas Giordano, Adrian Correndo, C. Mariano Cossani, Juan M. Ferreyra, Octavio P. Caviglia, Jeffrey A. Coulter, Ignacio A. Ciampitti, Romulo P. Lollato

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1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nitrogen management is central to the economic and environmental dimensions of agricultural sustainability. Yield response to nitrogen fertilisation results from multiple interacting factors. Theoretical frameworks are lagging for the interaction between nitrogen and air temperature, the focus of this study. We analyse the relation between yield response to nitrogen fertiliser and air temperature in the critical period of yield formation for spring wheat in Australia, winter wheat in the US, and maize in both the US and Argentina. Our framework assumes (i) yield response to nitrogen fertiliser is primarily related to grain number per m2, (ii) grain number is a function of three traits: the duration of the critical period, growth rate during the critical period, and reproductive allocation, and (iii) all three traits vary non-linearly with temperature. We show that “high” nitrogen supply may be positive, neutral, or negative for yield under “high” temperature, depending on the part of the response curve captured experimentally. The relationship between yield response to nitrogen and mean temperature in the critical period was strong in wheat and weak in maize. Negative associations for both spring wheat in Australia and winter wheat with low initial soil nitrogen (< 20 kg N ha-1) in the US highlight the dominant influence of a shorter critical period with higher temperature; with high initial soil nitrogen (> 120 kg N ha-1) that favoured grain number and compromised grain fill, the relation between yield response to nitrogen and temperature was positive for winter wheat. The framework is particularly insightful where data did not match predictions; a non-linear function integrating development, carbon assimilation and reproductive partitioning bounded the pooled data for maize in the US and Argentina, where water regime, previous crop, and soil nitrogen overrode the effect of temperature on yield response to nitrogen fertilisation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number903340
JournalFrontiers in Agronomy
Volume4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 27 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank GRDC-SARDI bilateral for funding (project DAS00166), the Kansas Corn Commission, Kansas State University, the Minnesota Agricultural Fertilizer Research and Education Council, the Minnesota Corn Research and Promotion Council, and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, and Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station project MIN-13-097 (Accession No. 218377) for financial support. Contribution no. 22-304-J from the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station. Furthermore, we thank the Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologia e Innovacion (PICT 2018-3584, PICT-2020- SERIEA-01122) and Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos (PID-UNER 2227) for funding, and Bayer Crop Science, Market Development for the funding of data acquisition.

Funding Information:
We thank the people and organisations that supported this study. For wheat in Australia: GRDC-SARDI bilateral for funding; Hart Field Site and the Faulkner family for farm facilities; NWilhelm, ZH Chow, J Fernández-López, T Lenz, A O’dea, G Sepúlveda, B Sleep and H Tura for field work; LongReach Plant Breeders and Australian Grain Technologies for seed. For wheat in the US: visiting scholars for data collection and processing, the Kansas Wheat Commission, the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, and the Kansas Cooperative Extension Service. For maize in the US: visiting scholars and interns for field work, and Corteva Agriscience, the Kansas Corn Commission, Kansas State University, the Minnesota Agricultural Fertilizer Research and Education Council, the Minnesota Corn Research and Promotion Council, and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station for financial support. We thank the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station for their contributions. For maize in Argentina: the Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologia e Innovacion and Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos for funding, and Bayer Crop Science, Market Development for field work and funding. OPC is a member of CONICET, the National Research Council of Argentina.

Funding Information:
We thank the people and organisations that supported this study. For wheat in Australia: GRDC-SARDI bilateral for funding; Hart Field Site and the Faulkner family for farm facilities; NWilhelm, ZH Chow, J Fernández-López, T Lenz, A O’dea, G Sepúlveda, B Sleep and H Tura for field work; LongReach Plant Breeders and Australian Grain Technologies for seed. For wheat in the US: visiting scholars for data collection and processing, the Kansas Wheat Commission, the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, and the Kansas Cooperative Extension Service. For maize in the US: visiting scholars and interns for field work, and Corteva Agriscience, the Kansas Corn Commission, Kansas State University, the Minnesota Agricultural Fertilizer Research and Education Council, the Minnesota Corn Research and Promotion Council, and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station for financial support. We thank the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station for their contributions. For maize in Argentina: the Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologia e Innovacion and Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos for funding, and Bayer Crop Science, Market Development for field work and funding. OPC is a member of CONICET, the National Research Council of Argentina.

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2022 Sadras, Giordano, Correndo, Cossani, Ferreyra, Caviglia, Coulter, Ciampitti and Lollato.

Keywords

  • allocation
  • critical period
  • daylength
  • development
  • fertiliser
  • growth rate
  • reaction norm
  • stress

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