Television viewing and hostile personality trait increase the risk of injuries

Anthony Fabio, Chung Yu Chen, Steven Dearwater, David R. Jacobs, Darin Erickson, Karen A. Matthews, Carlos Iribarren, Stephen Sidney, Mark A. Pereira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Individuals with high levels of hostility may be more susceptible to the influence of television on violence and risk taking behaviors. This study aimed to examine whether hostile personality trait modifies the association between TV viewing and injuries. It is a prospective study of 4,196 black and white adults aged 23 to 35 in 1990/1. Cross-lagged panel models were analyzed at three 5-year time periods to test whether TV viewing predicted injuries. Covariates were gender, race, and education. Individuals who watched more TV (0 hours, 1–3 hours, 4–6 hours, and ≥7 hours) were more likely to have a hospitalization for an injury in the following 5 years across each of the three follow-up periods [OR = 1.5 (95%CI = 1.2, 1.9), 1.5 (1.1, 1.9), and 1.9 (1.3, 2.6)]. The cross-lagged effects of TV viewing to injury were significant in the high hostility group [OR = 1.4 (95%CI = 1.1, 1.8), 1.3 (1.0, 1.8), and 2.0 (1.3, 2.9)] but not in the low hostility group [OR = 1.3 (95%CI = 0.6, 2.2), 1.1 (0.6, 2.1), and 1.4 (0.7, 2.8)]. Additionally, a statistically significant difference between the two models (P < 0.001) suggested that hostility moderated the relationship between TV watching and injury. These findings suggest that individuals who watch more TV and have a hostile personality trait may be at a greater risk for injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-53
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Injury Control and Safety Promotion
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported in part by research grants from the National Institute on Aging [R03AG028504] and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [U49-CE000764]. The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (CARDIA) is supported by contracts HHSN268201300025C, HHSN268201300026C, HHSN268201300027C, HHSN268201300028C, HHSN268201300029C, and HHSN268200900041C from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Aging (NIA), and an intra-agency agreement between NIA and NHLBI [AG0005].

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Copyright:
Copyright 2017 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • hostility
  • injury
  • television

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